BALBOA Concepts, Inc. REVIEW: Motivation to Achieve Success

“To All The Dreamers Out There”
by Dr. Moses

http://www.motivation-for-dreamers.com/motivation-to-achieve-success.html

BALBOA Concepts, Inc.

Motivation to achieve success – “To all the dreamers out there”

Turn off the T.V. Turn down the volume on your radio. Block out all noise. Be quiet and listen. Listen for just five minutes. I don’t want you to pay attention for my sake, but for yours. Are you not worth five minutes of your own time?

Do you have a deep desire to achieve something great? Do you want to live a more satisfying life? Can you see yourself being happy and successful in every way? Do you believe in your own potential and that here is much more to you than meets the eye?

If so, you are a dreamer. This article is dedicated to you. Right now you are the most important person around. If you had been the only person to ever read this article, I would still have written it, just for you. You are that special.

Motivation to achieve success – what is a dreamer?

But before we go any further, let me qualify what a dreamer is because people often don’t appreciate being called dreamers. In-fact, it’s almost an insult to call someone a dreamer these days. It’s associated with having your head in the clouds and not being realistic. So let me explain.

A dreamer is a person who is not afraid to challenge society’s norms and not afraid to tread their own path rather than following the well-trodden path. A dreamer is someone who is always willing to take a chance and always asks why before doing something that others are doing blindly. A dreamer is a person who has a great futuristic picture which they work to achieve at all costs. Dreamers are world changers.

Dreamers chart their own course and destiny. Dreamers are always striving to be the person they were meant to be and are not afraid to be different. I believe every one of us is born unique in every way, but over the years we work very hard to become like everyone else.

Motivation to achieve success – Don’t follow the crowd
Society’s commonsense tells us that that is the way to go. Unfortunately, commonsense is not always good-sense. It’s just common. If you are a dreamer you cannot afford to work on society’s assumptions and standards. You have to be unique.

For instance, a lot of people have spent anything from 15 to 20 years getting an education so they can have that perfect job and earn a huge salary. Unfortunately for most, the perfect job and the huge earnings never materialize. They only have the long hard years of work and loads of papers with unpronounceable names to show for it.

 

 

Most of them have lost touch with the very people they are working so hard to provide for – their husband, wife and children, all because of having to “work hard” for a living. Yet few ask themselves if there is a better way. They blindly follow what they’ve always been taught.

Motivation to achieve success – chart your own course
I am here to tell you that there is another way. It’s not for everyone. It’s not the only way. It’s not the easier way. Actually, it is more likely to be the harder way. But I guarantee you it is the best way. It is simply this – follow your dreams. If you can think it, you can have it.

Following your dreams, however, is a process and comes at a price. What is the process and what is the price to be paid? Be patient. All will be revealed. Patience, by the way is part of it. Get-rich-quick and easy success schemes don’t last.

Motivation to achieve success – What’s in store?
Over the coming weeks I will talk about the characteristics of a dreamer and some of the things you absolutely must do if you want to live the life you deserve to live. Some of them you may already know and others will be new. Whatever the case, you will pick up a number of useful ideas that may just make the difference between living in mediocrity and living a fulfilled life.

Brian Tracy states that “all successful men and women are big dreamers. They imagine what their future could be, ideal in every respect, and then they work every day toward their distant vision, that goal or purpose.”

If you are not a dreamer I urge you to watch this space every week. It may shed light into the darkness in your life. Together, we can find answers to some of life’s questions, but YOU have to do the searching.

Motivation to achieve success – “I can help”
I have struggled with and continue to struggle with many of life’s questions myself. These struggles have led me to some startling and amazing discoveries about human potential, achievement, motivation, success and living your dreams.

 

I have a curiosity about life and see lessons on success and achievement in the most ordinary of events or places. I want to share what I have learnt with you. I can’t promise you that you will achieve your dreams after reading my articles – that is entirely up to you and no one else. However, what I will share with you will immensely help you in your desire to live the life you want and deserve.

 

It is a marvel to think what would happen to Zambia if the dreamers woke up and did something about their dreams. This country would never be the same. But there is hope and it starts with each and every one of us making a difference in our own lives. You have no idea what impact a single person’s dream can have on an entire nation.

Motivation to achieve success – conclusion
I hope your dream will come to life and make a positive contribution to the lives of the people of this beautiful country. You can make all the difference and, if you are a dreamer, I know you are not waiting for someone else to do it. You do it!

 

Sadly but true, and in the words of Myles Munroe – “The poorest man in the world is the man without a dream. The most frustrated man in the world is the man with a dream that never becomes reality.”

Have a dream. Make it a reality. http://www.motivation-for-dreamers.com
http://www.motivation-for-dreamers.com/motivation-to-achieve-success.html

BALBOA Concepts, Inc. REVIEW

“Dreamers are world changers.” Having dreams means changing your future and the world’s. Dreaming means making your own path and setting your own standards. But, everything comes at a price. Being able to delay immediate gratification until the time is right, patience, is key when planning your future. Be curious, take risks, and make your dreams a reality!

BALBOA Concepts, Inc.

BALBOA Concepts, Inc. REVIEW: What Do You Want To Do With Your Life?

By Scott H. Young
http://www.scotthyoung.com/blog/2007/07/29/what-do-you-want-to-do-with-your-life/

What do you want to do with your life? It’s a question almost everyone asks themselves. It’s also a question I don’t believe you should bother asking in the first place.

“I don’t know what I want to do in life, all I know is that it isn’t this.”

That was the sentiment a friend reflected to me. She’s in her mid-twenties, smart, savvy and hard working. But she is still stuck working jobs that don’t hover much beyond minimum wage. Every year, she tells me, that she applies for Universities, but never goes through with it. Why? Because she can’t answer that question.

Passion Evolves

I worry a lot of people fall into the same trap. The trap of believing that they need to make big life decisions before they can start doing anything. The trap that you need to be born with a passion. And the lie that being able to combine your interests with a profession is easy.

When people ask me what I’m going to be doing in five or ten years, I usually tell them I’m going to be an entrepreneur. “Oh. What’s your business going to be?” I have reason to believe this internet business could be it. Between revenues and freelance work I’m expecting to make about ten thousand dollars this year. Concentrated effort for the next four or five years could definitely make this a livable income.

But I don’t usually say that. Because it isn’t the point. In all honesty, I have no idea where I am going to be in a decade. My track record shows that my passions have evolved considerably, even over the last couple years.

Ben Casnocha, the 19-year old CEO of Comcate, shows how his passion didn’t start with a flash of insight, in the book My Start Up Life:

“It didn’t start with a dream. It didn’t start with in a garage. It didn’t even start with an innovative epiphany, which are perhaps entrepreneurs’ most overplayed recollections.” He continues, relating the story of Jerry Kaplan’s epiphany moment in Kaplan’s book, Start Up. To which Ben adds, “I wish my epiphany were as primal. It wasn’t, and most aren’t.” [emphasis mine]

As Ben shares his story of being a teenage CEO, it becomes clear that his passion evolved. There were interests in entrepreneurship and making a difference. But from these interests, he made smaller steps, each building a passion. I don’t believe his journey ever started with deciding what he wanted to do with his life.

Replace Decision with Curiosity

Instead of making definite decisions about a career path, I believe you should get curious. Get curious about the way the world works. Notice your own interests and find small ways you can exercise passion in something. Even if you can’t find a way to make money off of it yet.

The bridge from passion to money-maker can’t be made hastily. Interests often get discarded because they cannot be immediately relayed into a source of income. And therefore aren’t as important as work that does.

Blogging is a great example. I know many bloggers who want to go pro. They want to take the interest they have and turn it into a passionate source of income. But blogging isn’t easy. Even the most rapid successes I’ve seen, took over a year before the author could claim blogging as more than a hobby. And those were due to writing talent, luck and an incredible amount of work.

Patience is a necessary ingredient in evolving a passion. But even more, you need to be open to other possibilities.

Interest to Income Isn’t a Straight Path

80% of new businesses fail in the first five years. But more interesting, is that of the 20% that succeeded, most didn’t do so in the way they had expected to.

Before setting up his immensely popular website, Steve Pavlina believed he would make most his revenue through products and workshops. But close to five years later, he makes all of it from advertising and affiliate sales. A revenue prospect he downplayed when making his business plan.

Similarly, I don’t believe that most people’s passions follow a straight path. Scott Adams began with a degree in economics and a position in a bank and now he is the successful cartoonist who created Dilbert.

Seven Steps to Evolving a Passion… and Making it Work

Step One – Gather Sparks of Curiosity

Don’t have an inferno of passion driving your actions yet? Don’t worry about it. Most people I know don’t. And if you are under thirty, you are probably in the overwhelming majority.

The first steps is to simply invest your energy into whims. Those little sparks of interest where you don’t know enough to make them a passion. Ben Casnocha calls this seeking randomness. For me, it has been a process of finding my intuition and using it to make small investments in things that are potentially interesting.

This means reading different books, taking on different activities and meeting different people. Broad associations gives a lot of chances to stumble on a passion that can work.

Step Two: Fan the Flames of Interest

After exposing yourself to a lot of randomness, you need to cultivate the successes. Build upon the little sparks of interest that come by your life. If you read a book about physics and like the subject, try taking a physics class. If you enjoy some basic programming try a small software project.

Step Three: Cut Out Distractions

Cultivating whims and exploring new passions requires time. One of the reasons I’ve placed such an emphasis on productivity with myself, is that without it I couldn’t explore these options.

If your interests are genuine and worth exploring, it shouldn’t be too difficult to eliminate the non-essentials. Distractions such as television, excess internet usage and video games only take a bit of conditioning to free up. The hard part is reallocating time you don’t believe is yours.

Step Four: Living Minimally

If you already have a job you aren’t passionate about, work only as much as you need to keep going. Valid passions need time to grow into income generating skills.

I don’t suggest becoming a starving artist and racking up huge debts. But avoid expanding your life to fit a bigger and bigger paycheck if you aren’t living your passion. Otherwise you simply trap yourself into a life that is comfortable, but otherwise dead.

Leo Babauta, author of ZenHabits is a great example of this. With six kids, freelancing work and another job to help support his family he found ways to cut expenses and focus on his passion. His website has quickly grown to become incredibly popular, and I wouldn’t be surprised if it was a stable source of income for him in a few years. Live minimally, and avoid getting trapped into a comfortable, but unsatisfying, life.

Step Five: Make a Passion that Creates Value

If you have a skill that creates social value, you can make money through almost any medium. Monetizing a passion takes skill, as any entrepreneur can tell you, but without providing legitimate value it is impossible.

You need to transform your developing passions into a skill that can fill human needs. Some passions are easy to translate. An interest in computers could allow you to become a software designer. Others are more difficult. A passion for poetry, may be more difficult to meet a specific human need.

Step Six: Find a Way to Monetize That Value

Once you have the ability to create social value, you need to turn that into a repeatable process for gaining income. This could be in the form of a job. As a programmer you could get hired by Google. Or, it could lead to becoming a freelancer or an entrepreneur.

Monetizing value isn’t easy. It requires that you learn how to market, sell yourself, and find ways to connect human needs. Whether you intend to work in a job or own a business makes no difference. You are the CEO of your life, so you need to know how to connect your passions with serving other people.

Step Seven: Go Back to Step One

Describing this process in steps is misleading. It implies that there is a destination. There is no destination. The process of following whims, cultivating passions, turning them into valuable skills and then finally earning revenue from them is lifelong. I have some passions that are in steps one and two. This blog is in the midst of step six. In ten years I may have gone through them all with a completely different passion.

Not all your passions will or can finish the sixth step. But as persistent as the myth you need to decide what you want to do with your life, is the myth you can only have one passion. I’m at a point where cultivating passions has meant I have too many options. Too many possible paths that could lead to enjoyable and fulfilling careers. Don’t obsess over one failed attempt.

What do you want to do with your life?

Your life doesn’t need to go through a predictable story arc. It doesn’t have to start with a dream, follow through hard work and end up in a nice home with four bedrooms. Instead it can twist and travel. You don’t have to know the final answer, you just need to act on the next step.

Article found here: http://www.scotthyoung.com/blog/2007/07/29/what-do-you-want-to-do-with-your-life/

BALBOA Concepts, Inc. REVIEW

One of the most important keys to success is passion. Once you’ve found a passion, make a decision to lose distractions and pursue it with persistence. Although some sacrifices must be made on the way to success, in the end you will know why you made them. Most importantly, make sure you are doing what you want to be doing with your life and don’t waste time living someone else’s goals.

BALBOA Concepts, Inc. REVIEW: I’m Glad I Dropped Out of College

By Steve JobsAugust 26, 2011

This is the text of the Commencement address by Steve Jobs, CEO of Apple Computer and of Pixar Animation Studios, delivered on June 12, 2005.

I am honored to be with you today at your commencement from one of the finest universities in the world. I never graduated from college. Truth be told, this is the closest I’ve ever gotten to a college graduation. Today I want to tell you three stories from my life. That’s it. No big deal. Just three stories.

The first story is about connecting the dots.

I dropped out of Reed College after the first 6 months, but then stayed around as a drop-in for another 18 months or so before I really quit. So why did I drop out?

It started before I was born. My biological mother was a young, unwed college graduate student, and she decided to put me up for adoption. She felt very strongly that I should be adopted by college graduates, so everything was all set for me to be adopted at birth by a lawyer and his wife. Except that when I popped out they decided at the last minute that they really wanted a girl. So my parents, who were on a waiting list, got a call in the middle of the night asking: “We have an unexpected baby boy; do you want him?” They said: “Of course.” My biological mother later found out that my mother had never graduated from college and that my father had never graduated from high school. She refused to sign the final adoption papers. She only relented a few months later when my parents promised that I would someday go to college.

And 17 years later I did go to college. But I naively chose a college that was almost as expensive as Stanford, and all of my working-class parents’ savings were being spent on my college tuition. After six months, I couldn’t see the value in it. I had no idea what I wanted to do with my life and no idea how college was going to help me figure it out. And here I was spending all of the money my parents had saved their entire life. So I decided to drop out and trust that it would all work out OK. It was pretty scary at the time, but looking back it was one of the best decisions I ever made. The minute I dropped out I could stop taking the required classes that didn’t interest me, and begin dropping in on the ones that looked interesting.

 

It wasn’t all romantic. I didn’t have a dorm room, so I slept on the floor in friends’ rooms, I returned coke bottles for the 5¢ deposits to buy food with, and I would walk the 7 miles across town every Sunday night to get one good meal a week at the Hare Krishna temple. I loved it. And much of what I stumbled into by following my curiosity and intuition turned out to be priceless later on. Let me give you one example:

Reed College at that time offered perhaps the best calligraphy instruction in the country. Throughout the campus every poster, every label on every drawer, was beautifully hand calligraphed. Because I had dropped out and didn’t have to take the normal classes, I decided to take a calligraphy class to learn how to do this. I learned about serif and san serif typefaces, about varying the amount of space between different letter combinations, about what makes great typography great. It was beautiful, historical, artistically subtle in a way that science can’t capture, and I found it fascinating.

None of this had even a hope of any practical application in my life. But ten years later, when we were designing the first Macintosh computer, it all came back to me. And we designed it all into the Mac. It was the first computer with beautiful typography. If I had never dropped in on that single course in college, the Mac would have never had multiple typefaces or proportionally spaced fonts. And since Windows just copied the Mac, its likely that no personal computer would have them. If I had never dropped out, I would have never dropped in on this calligraphy class, and personal computers might not have the wonderful typography that they do. Of course it was impossible to connect the dots looking forward when I was in college. But it was very, very clear looking backwards ten years later.

Again, you can’t connect the dots looking forward; you can only connect them looking backwards. So you have to trust that the dots will somehow connect in your future. You have to trust in something – your gut, destiny, life, karma, whatever. This approach has never let me down, and it has made all the difference in my life.

My second story is about love and loss.

 

I was lucky – I found what I loved to do early in life. Woz and I started Apple in my parents garage when I was 20. We worked hard, and in 10 years Apple had grown from just the two of us in a garage into a $2 billion company with over 4000 employees. We had just released our finest creation – the Macintosh – a year earlier, and I had just turned 30. And then I got fired. How can you get fired from a company you started? Well, as Apple grew we hired someone who I thought was very talented to run the company with me, and for the first year or so things went well. But then our visions of the future began to diverge and eventually we had a falling out. When we did, our Board of Directors sided with him. So at 30 I was out. And very publicly out. What had been the focus of my entire adult life was gone, and it was devastating.

I really didn’t know what to do for a few months. I felt that I had let the previous generation of entrepreneurs down – that I had dropped the baton as it was being passed to me. I met with David Packard and Bob Noyce and tried to apologize for screwing up so badly. I was a very public failure, and I even thought about running away from the valley. But something slowly began to dawn on me – I still loved what I did. The turn of events at Apple had not changed that one bit. I had been rejected, but I was still in love. And so I decided to start over.

I didn’t see it then, but it turned out that getting fired from Apple was the best thing that could have ever happened to me. The heaviness of being successful was replaced by the lightness of being a beginner again, less sure about everything. It freed me to enter one of the most creative periods of my life.

During the next five years, I started a company named NeXT, another company named Pixar, and fell in love with an amazing woman who would become my wife. Pixar went on to create the worlds first computer animated feature film, Toy Story, and is now the most successful animation studio in the world. In a remarkable turn of events, Apple bought NeXT, I returned to Apple, and the technology we developed at NeXT is at the heart of Apple’s current renaissance. And Laurene and I have a wonderful family together.

I’m pretty sure none of this would have happened if I hadn’t been fired from Apple. It was awful tasting medicine, but I guess the patient needed it. Sometimes life hits you in the head with a brick. Don’t lose faith. I’m convinced that the only thing that kept me going was that I loved what I did. You’ve got to find what you love. And that is as true for your work as it is for your lovers. Your work is going to fill a large part of your life, and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work. And the only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven’t found it yet, keep looking. Don’t settle. As with all matters of the heart, you’ll know when you find it. And, like any great relationship, it just gets better and better as the years roll on. So keep looking until you find it. Don’t settle.

 

My third story is about death.

When I was 17, I read a quote that went something like: “If you live each day as if it was your last, someday you’ll most certainly be right.” It made an impression on me, and since then, for the past 33 years, I have looked in the mirror every morning and asked myself: “If today were the last day of my life, would I want to do what I am about to do today?” And whenever the answer has been “No” for too many days in a row, I know I need to change something.

Remembering that I’ll be dead soon is the most important tool I’ve ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life. Because almost everything – all external expectations, all pride, all fear of embarrassment or failure – these things just fall away in the face of death, leaving only what is truly important. Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose. You are already naked. There is no reason not to follow your heart.

About a year ago I was diagnosed with cancer. I had a scan at 7:30 in the morning, and it clearly showed a tumor on my pancreas. I didn’t even know what a pancreas was. The doctors told me this was almost certainly a type of cancer that is incurable, and that I should expect to live no longer than three to six months. My doctor advised me to go home and get my affairs in order, which is doctor’s code for prepare to die. It means to try to tell your kids everything you thought you’d have the next 10 years to tell them in just a few months. It means to make sure everything is buttoned up so that it will be as easy as possible for your family. It means to say your goodbyes.

I lived with that diagnosis all day. Later that evening I had a biopsy, where they stuck an endoscope down my throat, through my stomach and into my intestines, put a needle into my pancreas and got a few cells from the tumor. I was sedated, but my wife, who was there, told me that when they viewed the cells under a microscope the doctors started crying because it turned out to be a very rare form of pancreatic cancer that is curable with surgery. I had the surgery and I’m fine now.

This was the closest I’ve been to facing death, and I hope its the closest I get for a few more decades. Having lived through it, I can now say this to you with a bit more certainty than when death was a useful but purely intellectual concept:

 

No one wants to die. Even people who want to go to heaven don’t want to die to get there. And yet death is the destination we all share. No one has ever escaped it. And that is as it should be, because Death is very likely the single best invention of Life. It is Life’s change agent. It clears out the old to make way for the new. Right now the new is you, but someday not too long from now, you will gradually become the old and be cleared away. Sorry to be so dramatic, but it is quite true.

Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life. Don’t be trapped by dogma – which is living with the results of other people’s thinking. Don’t let the noise of others’ opinions drown out your own inner voice. And most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary.

When I was young, there was an amazing publication called The Whole Earth Catalog, which was one of the bibles of my generation. It was created by a fellow named Stewart Brand not far from here in Menlo Park, and he brought it to life with his poetic touch. This was in the late 1960?s, before personal computers and desktop publishing, so it was all made with typewriters, scissors, and polaroid cameras. It was sort of like Google in paperback form, 35 years before Google came along: it was idealistic, and overflowing with neat tools and great notions.

Stewart and his team put out several issues of The Whole Earth Catalog, and then when it had run its course, they put out a final issue. It was the mid-1970s, and I was your age. On the back cover of their final issue was a photograph of an early morning country road, the kind you might find yourself hitchhiking on if you were so adventurous. Beneath it were the words: “Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish.” It was their farewell message as they signed off. Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish. And I have always wished that for myself. And now, as you graduate to begin anew, I wish that for you.

Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish.

Thank you all very much.

http://www.lewrockwell.com/2011/08/steve-jobs/im-glad-i-dropped-out-of-college/

BALBOA Concepts, Inc. REVIEW

Steve Jobs reached amazing feats in his life. Although he dropped out of school, he still made something of himself while revolutionizing the world of technology. That’s not to say that we shouldn’t receive proper education, but the message is that even when brought down, even when at a disadvantage, keep moving forward. Jobs used the resources he had to do what he could without looking back. We should all strive to Stay Hungry and Stay Foolish. 

 

BALBOA Concepts, Inc. REVIEW: Nine Reasons to Embrace Failure

I’ve always heard that “public speaking” is the number one most common fear. According to a recent survey I conducted in my e-newsletter, however, this is not the case. Overwhelmingly my readership chose “failure.”

Like public speaking, failure is not inherently bad. We’re conditioned to avoid it, but there are plenty of reasons to change our perspective. Here are nine advantages to failing:

  1. Failure teaches us. Two words I will never misspell are “flexible” and “exchequer.” Why? Because each word knocked me out of a junior high spelling bee. Failure creates an emotional experience, so the lessons we learn when it happens stick. Additionally, going through failure narrows down the possible approaches to success. Scientists rely on trial and error in their research. Each failed experiment brings them a little closer to revolutionary breakthroughs. Think of your own efforts as experiments. When you don’t get the desired results, figure out why. Then try again with your new knowledge.
  2. Failure reveals our ability. You’ll never know how much weight you can lift until you reach an amount you can’t. trainers often refer to this as “lifting to failure.” Pushing yourself as far as you can lets you know what’s possible. By avoiding limits, you’ll never reach your peak. The fear of failure stops us a lot shorter than failure itself. So keep going until nothing more is possible. Then celebrate what you’ve accomplished.
  3. Failure makes us stronger. Those same weight lifter who lift to failure also have learned that is the way they build muscle. At first the tissue is damaged, but it’ll heal bigger and stronger than before. Soon the athlete will be able to lift more weight. The same is true for our pursuits. Failure strengthens our character. We humans bounce higher than we fall. Know that with each effort, you grow a little stronger.
  4. Failure inspires us. When we don’t let discouragement hold us back, failure makes our desire burn hotter. Often this inspiration is a wish to avoid another failure. Many people don’t know that Michael Jordan was cut from his high school basketball team. “It was good because it made me know what disappointment felt like,” he told the Chicago Tribune. “And I knew that I didn’t want to have that feeling ever again.” This led to a work of ethic that would elevate him to legendary status. If failure makes you work harder or focus more, it’s an experience with tremendous value.
  5. Failure inspires others. Leaders must take risks. Even when they don’t succeed, their courage can still make a difference. In 1980, 18-year-old Terry Fox attempted to raise $1 million for cancer research by running across the entire length of Canada on a prosthetic leg. He ran 3339 miles before a relapsed cancer ended his quest. He lost his life, but his effort has inspired over $340 million in donations to date. His “failure” was hardly in vain.
  6. Failure builds courage. Becoming more comfortable with failing enables you to take more risks. If you know you can stomach it, it will no longer threaten you. I used to take groups through ropes courses, requiring them to pursue physical challenges thirty feet off the ground. Often participants would fail at the first high event. While some got discouraged, others discovered that failing wasn’t so bad. They were proud for having tried in the first place. Knowing that failure was an option made it easier for them to try the next event. Their courage came not from achieving success, but from their willingness to pursue to it. If you’re open to failing, you’ll readily take more chances.
  7. Failure is better than regret. The times I’ve been denied an opportunity never felt as bad as when I’ve let opportunities pass me by. At least when we fall, we know. Not trying at all leaves us wondering. Avoid kicking yourself later by taking a leap today.
  8. Failure leaves us open to better opportunities. I was once turned down for a job for which I thought I was the perfect candidate. While unemployment can be scary, rejection can be humiliating. After a few weeks of frustration, I was offered another position I hadn’t pursued. This opportunity was more interesting and considerably more lucrative. Without an awareness of the big picture, it’s easy to perceive failure as misfortune. Maybe it’s nature’s way of making sure we wind up where we’re best suited.
  9. Failure makes success a little sweeter. We appreciate victory more when we’ve tasted defeat. Life wouldn’t be fun if things always worked out. Know that your failure is just part of the game we’re all playing. We expend a lot of energy running from failure. Try embracing it. Find the opportunity in the adversity. If there’s a recipe for success, failure might be its primary ingredient.

http://www.scottgreenberg.com

BALBOA Concepts, Inc. REVIEW

This article is a great example of why we should never give up on our goals. Without failure, there are no lessons learned. Without failure, success seems mundane and expected. Failure teaches us one more way of not accomplishing something, therefore pushing you one step closer to success. Reaching your goals is a wonderful thing, especially if you’ve worked hard for it. You appreciate your successes much more after experiencing failure. This also allows you to see that it is alright to make mistakes and gives you the courage to try something new, without the fear of messing up or not succeeding. We just have to remember to keep pushing forward no matter how many obstacles get in the way. 

 

BALBOA Concepts, Inc. REVIEW: MBAs Expect a 140% Pay Increase From Degree

July 14, 2013

Everyone knows MBAs tend to be a confident bunch. But when does self-confidence veer into the Pollyannaish territory of completely unrealistic expectations?

Business school applicants in the U.S. say they expect the MBA degree to lift their current salaries by a whopping 140%, to an average of $140,000 a year from their pre-MBA salaries of $58,000.

If that increase sounds overly optimistic, candidates in many other countries have even greater expectations, according to a new survey of MBA candidates by QS TopMBA.com, an organization that holds admissions fairs for business schools. Prospective students in Switzerland said they anticipate post-MBA salaries of $200,000, which would reflect a 145% increase over pre-MBA pay of $82,000, the highest salaries of any MBA applicants in the world.

MBA applicants from India expect the largest percentage increase. They believe the MBA degree will boost their pre-MBA pay by 369% to $112,000, from just $24,000 a year. The current pay of Indian candidates is among the lowest reported by any MBA applicants in the world. Only applicants in Nigeria reported lower salaries: $21,000 on average.

In China, a country like India from which much of the growth in business education is occurring, MBA applicants expect the degree to provide a 245% increase in salary to $121,000 a year from only $35,000 a year currently.

What makes the numbers especially optimistic is the fact that QS did not survey applicants to only the top schools but to a wider variety of business schools whose graduates tend to make considerably less than those at such schools as Harvard, Stanford, Wharton, London Business School, INSEAD and other top-ranked institutions.

Yet, even in the best of all possible worlds, the average salaries at the highest ranked schools would fall well below the expectation of U.S. applicants for average salary of $140,000. Graduates of Harvard Business School reported average base salaries of $124,000 in 2012, for example. Only when you include the average signing bonus of $26,200 at HBS do you exceed the overall expectation—and that is for the graduates of Harvard Business School.

At Georgetown University’s McDonough School, in contrast, the average starting salary last year was $99,799. Even adding the average signing bonus of some $24,100 would make an MBA graduate from McDonough fall some $16,000 short of the expected salary in the QS survey.

Still, compared to 2012, there has been a general drop in candidates’ current earning as well as their target salaries, according to the report. In the U.S., for example, applicants reported making $58,000 a year, down from $61,000 in 2012. A year earlier, MBA applicants expected to make $153,000 a year when they graduated. That expectation has fallen this year by $13,000 to $140,000 a year. In short, applicants in previous years were even less realistic than those polled in the past year.

 

Chairman & Editor-in-Chief at C-Change Media Inc.

BALBOA Concepts, Inc. REVIEW:

We should always be hopeful and strive to reach our best, but at the same time, we must be realistic about our expectations. As stated in the article, several MBA graduates have very high expectations of their starting salary. By having high expectations, they will most likely be disappointed. These graduates will most likely eventually reach their target salary, but not right away. Greatness takes work and time to achieve and one cannot assume that you will be rewarded immediately. Here at Balbao, we value our time by working hard and knowing that by doing so, you will eventually reach your goal. 

 

BALBOA Concepts, Inc. REVIEWS: Don’t Hope…Decide!

Moral Stories
Inspirational Stories – Motivational Stories—by AcademicTips.org

Don’t Hope,… Decide!
by Stephen on September 26, 2008
in Marriage, Motivational Stories

While waiting to pick up a friend at the airport in Portland, Oregon, I had one of those life-changing experiences that you hear other people talk about—the kind that sneaks up on you unexpectedly. This one occurred a mere two feet away from me.

Straining to locate my friend among the passengers deplaning through the jet way, I noticed a man coming toward me carrying two light bags. He stopped right next to me to greet his family.

First he motioned to his youngest son (maybe six years old) as he laid down his bags. They gave each other a long, loving hug. As they separated enough to look in each other’s face, I heard the father say, “It’s so good to see you, son. I missed you so much!” His son smiled somewhat shyly, averted his eyes and replied softly, “Me, too, Dad!”

Then the man stood up, gazed in the eyes of his oldest son (maybe nine or ten) and while cupping his son’s face in his hands said, “You’re already quite the young man, I love you very much Zach!” They too hugged a most loving, tender hug.

While this was happening, a baby girl (perhaps one or one-and-a-half) was squirming excitedly in her mother’s arms, never once taking her little eyes off the wonderful sight of her returning father. The man said, “Hi, baby girl!” as he gently took the child from her mother. He quickly kissed her face all over and then held her close to his chest while rocker her from side to side. The little girl instantly relaxed and simply laid her head on his shoulder, motionless in pure contentment.

After several moment, he handed his daughter to his oldest son and declared, “I’ve saved the best for last!” and proceeded to give his wife the longest, most passionate kiss I ever remember seeing. He gazed into her eyes for several seconds and then silently mouthed, “I love you so much!” They stared at each other’s eyes, beaming big smiles at one another, while holding both hands.

For an instant they reminded me of newlyweds, but I knew by the age of their kids that they couldn’t possibly be. I puzzled about it for a moment then realized how totally engrossed I was in the wonderful display of unconditional love not more than an arm’s length away from me. I suddenly felt uncomfortable, as if I was invading something sacred, but was amazed to hear my own voice nervously ask, “Wow! How long have you two been married?”

“Been together fourteen years total, married twelve of those.” he replied, without breaking his gaze from his lovely wife’s face. “Well then, how long have you been away?” I asked. The man finally turned and looked at me, still beaming his joyous smile. “Two whole days!”

Two days? I was stunned. By the intensity of the greeting, I had assumed he’d been gone for at least several weeks—if not months. I know my expression betrayed me.

I said almost offhandedly, hoping to end my intrusion with some semblance of grace (and to get back to searching for my friend), “I hope my marriage is still that passionate after twelve years!”

The man suddenly stopped smiling.

He looked me straight in the eye, and with forcefulness that burned right into my soul, he told me something that left me a different person. He told me, “Don’t hope, friend…decide!” Then he flashed me his wonderful smile again, shook my ahand and said, “God bless!”

 

By Michael D. Hargrove and Bottom Line Underwriters, Inc
Copyright 1997

Academictips.org/blogs/don’t-hopedecide/

 Balboa Concepts, Inc. Review

Our team here at Balboa likes to keep a positive attitude in the workplace. This story is a great example of taking your life into your own hands and deciding what you’ll do with it. The man in the story says “Don’t hope… Decide!” We must all decide how to live our life and not just sit and hope, waiting for things to turn around. At Balboa, our team decides to live and work each day with a positive, outgoing attitude determined to succeed. We do not just wait for things to happen, we make them happen. Our team spirit is the drive that keeps us up and running and allows us to succeed every day.

 

 

BALBOA Concepts, Inc.: Review

“Boldt Action”

For over a century the Waldorf-Astoria hotel in New York has reigned as a symbol of grandeur of the American dream. It all began when William Waldorf Astor razed his home at Fifth Avenue on Thirty-fourth Street to construct the Waldorf, a magnificent hostelry that, when it opened on 13 March 1893, boasted 450 rooms and an army of nearly 1,000 employees. the Waldorf hosted the most famous of guests and the most elegant of society functions (after John Jacob Astor IV built the Astoria next door in 1897, the two hotels were run jointly as the Waldorf-Astoria) until it was closed on 3 May 1929 to make way for what would become the world’s most famous skyscraper, the Empire State Building. 

A new Waldorf-Astoria was constructed on the block extending from Park Avenue to Lexington, between Forty-ninth and Fiftieth Streets and opened in 1931. Although it was William Waldorf Astor who conceived and financed the opulent Waldorf Hotel, it was the Waldorf’s first manager, George C. Boldt who established the premiere level of service for which the Waldorf (and later the Waldorf-Astoria) became world-renowned. The story of how George C. Boldt, who came to America as a nearly penniless European immigrant, ended up as the manager of the finest hotel in the world is a rather remarkable one. One version of the tale (origin unknown) that has been circulating on the internet lately reads as follows:

 

One stormy night many years ago, an elderly man and his wife entered the lobby of a small hotel in Philadelphia. Trying to get out of the rain, the couple approached the front desk hoping to get some shelter for the night.
“Could you possibly give us a room here?” the husband asked. The clerk, a friendly man with a winning smile, looked at the couple and explained that there were three conventions in town.
“All of our rooms are taken,” the clerk said. “But I can’t send a nice couple like you out in the rain at one o’clock in the morning. Would you perhaps be willing to sleep in my room? It’s not exactly a suite, but it will be good enough to make you folks comfortable for the night.”
When the couple declined, the young man pressed on. “Don’t worry about me; I’ll make out just fine,” the clerk told them. So the couple agreed.
As he paid his bill the next morning, the elderly man said to the clerk, “You are the king of manager who should be the boss of the best hotel in the United States. Maybe someday I’ll build one for you.”
The clerk looked at the couple and smiled. The three of them had a good laugh.
As they drove away, the elderly couple agreed that the helpful clerk was indeed exceptional, as finding people who are both friendly and helpful isn’t easy.
Two years passed. The clerk had almost forgotten the incident when he received a letter from the old man. It recalled that stormy night and enclosed a round-trip ticket to New York, asking the young man to pay them a visit.
The old man met him in New York, and led him to the corner of Fifth Avenue and 34th Street. He then pointed to a great new building there, a palace of reddish stone, with turrets and watch towers thrusting up to the sky.
“That,” said the older man, “is the hotel I have just built for you to manage.”
“You must be joking,” the young man said.
“I can assure you that I am not,” said the older man, a sly smile playing around his mouth.
The old man’s name was William Waldorf Astor, and the magnificent structure was the original Waldorf-Astoria Hotel. The young clerk who became its first manager was George C. Boldt.
The young clerk never foresaw the turn of events that would lead him to become the manager of one of the world’s most glamorous hotels. The Bible says that we are not to turn out backs on those who are in need, for we might be entertaining angels.

 

Although the basic facts of this version are true, some of the details are (typically) exaggerated. First of all, George C. Boldt was no mere hotel clerk. He had arrived at New York Harbor from central Europe in the 1860s with little money, and the only job he could obtain was a dishwasher at a Merchants’ Exchange Hotel. After a brief excursion to Texas in search of better employment opportunities failed to pan out, Boldt returned to New York (with even less money this time) and took another kitchen job. Boldt was soon promoted to a cashier position, where his industriousness and attention to service made such an impression on an upstate New York hotel owner that Boldt was offered a position as a hotel manager. In time, Boldt turned a 24-room hotel on Philadelphia’s Broad Street into the Bellevue, the best hotel in Philadelphia. (Another property, the Stratford, was soon added to form the Bellevue-Stratford). Thus it was Boldt the manager of the Bellevue who, on the evening when the enormously wealthy William Waldorf Astor entered the Bellevue in search of living space for himself and his wife, moved his own family out of his personal suite of rooms to accommodate Mr. and Mrs. Astor. (A mere clerk would not have a room of his own in a hotel like the Bellevue, especially one that could accommodate a couple.) At forty-three, Astor was not exactly “elderly”; and Boldt, who was about forty, was no “young man.”

Additionally, it came as no surprise to Boldt when he was tapped to manage the newly-built ‘Waldorf Hotel in 1893. (As noticed above, William Waldorf Astor didn’t build the “Waldorf-Astoria”—he built the Waldorf Hotel, which didn’t become the Waldorf-Astoria until John Jacob Astor IV erected the Astoria Hotel next door 4 years later). Boldt didn’t suddenly receive a ticket out of the blue from Astor one day—he and Astor had become close friends since meeting at the Bellevue 2 years earlier. And the Waldorf certainly built for Boldt—Astor enjoyed visiting hotels and “wanted to outshine them all” by building the grandest one yet. He would have done so whether or not he had Boldt waiting in the wings to manage it.

The George C. Boldt story has a sad coda, however. Boldt eventually became quite wealthy himself, and he invested $2.5 million in constructing an exquisitely detailed replica of a 16th century Rhineland castle (enclosed a 120-room mansion in eleven buildings) on an island in Alexandria Bay as a Valentine’s Day present for his wife Louise. Boldt’s wife died suddenly in January 1904, and the heartbroken hotelier order all was acquired by the Thousand Islands Bridge Authority in 1977.

 

Balboa Concepts, Inc. Review: At Balboa, we like to be a strong, motivated group of people that strives to succeed. This article sends a message that one should always be generous and help others. By doing this, unexpected rewards will come your way. Here at Balboa, we encourage our staff and any prospectives to be the best person they can achieve, always have goals, and always try to reach them. By being the best you can be, unexpected rewards may come your way, just like it did for George C. Boldt when he helped out an elderly couple long ago.

William Waldorf Astor also never gave up his dream of building one of the most luxurious hotels in the United States. He set his goal and reached to obtain it. The Balboa staff can appreciate this motivation to reach its goals because those are the concepts integrated into the company. Set goals, work hard to reach them, and never give up.

 

 

Sources:

Dash, Judi. “Tall Tales from the Thousand Islands.”
            Chicago Sun-Times. 29 August 1993 (p. T1)

Morehouse, Wand III. The Waldorf-Astoria: America’s Gilded Dream.
            New York: M. Evans & Company, Inc. ISBN D-87131-663-3 (pp. 1-28)

Tan, Paul Lee. Encyclopedia of 7700 Illustrations.
            Rockville, Maryland: Assurance Publishers, 1979. ISBN 0-88469-100-4 (pp. 706-707)

The (Bergen County) Record. “Awakening to the History of Older Hotels.”
            31 October 1993 (p. T3)